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Announcing the 100 Years of Rita Hayworth Blogathon!

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"Whatever you write about me, don’t make it sad." -- Rita Hayworth

On October 17, 1918, Margarita Carmen Cansino was born. In the 1930s, she became Rita Hayworth, and over the next few decades, she was the iconic "Love Goddess." To this day, she remains a stunning talent and tragic figure for millions of film fans. For three days in October, I'll be celebrating this tremendous woman -- and just in time for her 100th birthday, too!

I know it seems silly to announce this so early, but I'm going to be out of the country for two weeks soon, I'm about to start grad school, and I was afraid someone would beat me to the punch, so early announcement it was!
The Rules:
You can write about anything relating to Hayworth -- her films, her personal life, her dancing, her Hispanic heritage, the list goes on! I also won't limit how many posts you want to do.

This probably goes without saying, but I would like for this event to be a loving tribute to Rita, so pleas…

Judy Garland proves her mettle in... Broadway Melody of 1938 (1937)

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After the success of 1929's The Broadway Melody, the first talkie to win Best Picture, MGM made a whole series of "Broadway Melody" films. While none of them have the same characters, the films are similar in their plots about backstage musicals and MGM always made sure they were full of glitz, glamour, and talent. Roy del Ruth's Broadway Melody of 1938 is a perfect example of this. Starring Robert Taylor, Eleanor Powell, Judy Garland, Sophie Tucker, Buddy Ebsen, George Murphy, and more, this movie is filled with bouncy musical numbers, beautiful cinematography, a nice score comprised of mostly Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown tunes, and some truly impressive moments.
I'll be honest: when I started writing this post, I thought I had already seen Broadway Melody of 1938 only to realize that I had confused it for the movie that came before it, Broadway Melody of 1936, which also features Powell, Taylor, and Ebsen, plus another score by Brown and Freed. Admittedly…